Let’s talk about the recent media hit that Tara Strong has had to deal with and not just that, but Howard Tern. (if you get the Animaniacs reference, thumbs up for you). For those of you who don’t, hopefully this will refresh your memories.

 

 

Now, I’m not gonna debate anything, but let me get the video real quick.

 

 

You guys can bitch and whine or whatever, but this is the interview people have been going ape shit about.

 

Tara Strong later made this Twitter response.

 

 

So once again, Miss Strong has proven to us that haters gonna hate and ponies gonna pwn. I’ll leave it at that. So, time for some real news.

 

 

Mayer gets $70 million pay package to lead Yahoo

By Alexei Oreskovic and Peter Lauria

 

(Reuters) – New Yahoo Chief Executive Marissa Mayer’s compensation package could total more than $70 million in salary, bonuses, restricted stock and stock options over five years, according to a regulatory filing made by the company Thursday.

Mayer’s pay package is broken out into $1 million in annual salary, as much as $2 million in an annual bonus, and $42 million in stock options and other awards, as well as $14 million in “make whole restricted options” for forfeiture of compensation from Google Inc.

As the first female Google engineer and one of its earliest employees, Mayer’s net worth is already estimated to be as much as $300 million.

Yahoo’s hiring of Mayer as CEO from Google earlier this week caught analysts, investors and even some employees by surprise. Mayer, 37, edged out presumed front-runner and acting CEO Ross Levinsohn to become Yahoo’s third CEO in a year.

Industry observers believe Mayer’s selection over Levinsohn is a signal that Yahoo is likely to renew its focus on Web technology and products rather than beefing up online content.

Her appointment caps a tumultuous year at Yahoo. In May, Scott Thompson resigned as CEO after less than 6 months on the job as a controversy flared up over his academic credentials. Thompson replaced the controversial Carol Bartz, fired in September after failing to revitalize Yahoo.

Thompson’s total compensation at hire was valued at $27 million. He got no severance but was able to keep the $7 million in compensation he got for leaving Paypal. Bartz got more than $10 million in severance when she was fired last year.

A self-described “geek” with a master’s degree in computer science from Stanford, Mayer has frequently championed bringing more women into tech.

Mayer reported for her first day of work as CEO on Tuesday, the same day Yahoo announced weak financial results, with flat net revenue and a slight decline in profit during the second quarter.

Though she was on the company’s sprawling Sunnyvale, Calif, campus, she did not participate in its earnings call. For his part, Levinsohn was also absent from the call, which was led by Yahoo’s Chief Financial Officer Tim Morse.

GLAMOROUS LIFE

Mayer joins Yahoo as something of a celebrity, having already established herself as one of Silicon Valley’s leading women, both inside and outside of the office. She is known for her love of fashion and regularly appears on the society pages for hosting parties — from intimate literary salons in her Four Seasons penthouse in San Francisco to Christmas bashes at her home in Silicon Valley near the Googleplex.

In 2009 she married real estate investor Zachary Bogue–Mayer tweeted that the couple is expected their first child, a boy, in October.

In 2010, the couple hosted a $30,000-a-plate fundraiser dinner for President Obama at Mayer’s Palo Alto home. And late last year, Mayer became an Internet meme after she was filmed dancing to an MC Hammer beat in a YouTube video made to support San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee’s election effort.

Despite the upheaval, Yahoo remains one of the world’s most popular websites, with more than 700 million monthly visitors, according to the company. But the company has seen its revenue growth stall, amid an industrywide decline in online display advertising prices and competition from Facebook Inc and Google.

Visitors to Yahoo-branded websites increased 2 percent year-on-year during the second quarter, Yahoo said. But queries on Yahoo’s U.S. core search websites declined 17 percent during the second quarter, the number of minutes visitors spent on its media properties fell 10 percent.

 
Now for a hilarious story. A women takes pictures of herself nude and gets arrested. Women arrested in Japan? Madness!

 

Woman Arrested for Taking Nude Pictures of Herself

Author: Artefact

 

A woman has been arrested for the outrageous crime of taking photographs of herself naked for the edification of male admirers, prompting much outrage online.

National cybercrimes investigators in Kyoto were conducting a “cyber-patrol” when they encountered a woman offering SD cards containing 70 photos and 20 movies of herself in various erotic situations for the sum of ¥6,000.

Such a serious crime prompted a rapid investigation, and soon they had arrested a 21-year-old Hiroshima prefecture nursing assistant, finding she had made some ¥600,000 in sales to a hundred customers.

She was charged with distributing obscene materials (although it appears she did censor them), which she admitted saying “I did it by myself to earn a little extra cash.”

There is general confusion as just why she was arrested – the letter of the law actually makes no mention of having to mosaic genitals (this rule was invented by a government agency as a way of giving retiring cops lucrative makework), and in fact attaches a 2 year prison sentence to “electronically distributing obscene materials for profit.”

Mysteriously this does not apply to pornography which pays to have its mosaics checked by the aforementioned agency, magically rendering them non-obscene.

Online there is the usual despair at the policing priorities of Japanese police, who are apparently so intent on pursuing random exhibitionists that they have no time to deal with all the brothels under their noses or all the children being bullied to death in schools:

“Why did they even arrest her?”

“Pics please.”

“That is surprisingly cheap.”

“If only she had put a mosaic in there…”

“How is this any different from AVs?”

“Those Kyoto cops again…”

“She’s only a nursing assistant so I doubt she gets paid much.”

“Poor little angel!”

“Honestly, they ignore all the porn stars who do this stuff all the time to pick on her? They are only picking on her because she’s freelancing I bet.”

“Basically they want you to keep supporting their friends in the yakuza who run the porn business and pay them off.”

“Why on earth would you waste public money arresting someone for this in this day and age, with the Internet overflowing with these pictures?”

“As expected of those Kyoto cops!”

2ch has actually discovered who she was (not a difficult proposition as the police and mass media helpfully reported her full name).

 

Full gallery via post link, enjoy. I find it funny that women in Japan can be arrested, I was under the impression that the feminazis had taken over the damn place years ago and that women can’t be arrested, only men. I guess I was wrong!
And next up we have an Asuka Langley figurine.

 

Asuka Langley Entry Plug Figure

Author: Leon

 


For fans of Evangeleon, I highly recommend you pick this up. If you grew up in the 90s and loved giant robots and 90s women and such, you will love this. Go pick it up by clicking on the image.

 

Judge gives Missouri couple custody of illegal immigrant’s child

 

A Greene County juvenile court ruled Wednesday in favor of a Missouri couple seeking to adopt the child of a Guatemalan woman who had been arrested and detained for working in the country illegally.

The decision culminates a lengthy international custody dispute over the child that put American immigration policies under scrutiny and drew outrage from a Guatemalan diplomat and others fighting for immigrant rights.

Judge David Jones ruled in a closed Springfield, Mo., courtroom that the 5-year-old boy’s birth mother, Encarnacion Bail Romero, had abandoned the child. The ruling terminated the birth mother’s parental rights and paved the way for Seth and Melinda Moser of Carthage, Mo., to formally adopt the child.

The couple have raised the boy since he was an infant. The boy, Carlos Jamison Moser, who goes by the name Jamison, just completed preschool, said the family’s attorney, Joe Hensley.

“The Mosers are very happy,” Hensley said. “This is something that’s been hanging over their heads for years. They’re ready to close that chapter of their lives and move on.”

Romero, who has been allowed to remain in the country awaiting the outcome of the dispute, was present in the courtroom. Romero’s attorney, Curtis Woods, said that his client was “very upset” and that he planned to appeal Wednesday’s ruling..

Those working for immigration rights who had watched the case closely said they were disappointed.

“Cases like these are the byproducts of fundamental gaps in the immigration and child welfare systems that make it all but impossible for parents in immigration detention to participate in proceedings affecting custody of their children,” said Emily Butera of the Women’s Refugee Commission’s detention and asylum program.

The case garnered international attention in 2008 after Romero challenged the Mosers’ adoption of the child. At the time of the adoption, Romero was in detention awaiting potential deportation to Guatemala after being arrested in May 2007 during a raid on illegal workers at a poultry plant in Barry County.

While Romero was in custody, her child, an infant at the time, was passed around among family members before eventually being adopted privately by the Mosers. That adoption was overturned in the appellate court.

The decision Wednesday follows the January 2011 Missouri Supreme Court ruling that sent the case back to the circuit courts after finding that the mother’s rights had not been upheld in a Jasper County court.

During that Supreme Court hearing, the Mosers argued that even if their adoption wasn’t proper — which was key to Romero’s case — it wouldn’t be in the best interest of the child to take him away from the parents he knows now and send him to another country.

The boy, who is a citizen of both the U.S. and Guatemala, speaks only English.

Attorneys for Romero, who does not speak English, said she was not given proper legal counsel or proper communication with the court, nor did she fully understand her rights and the proceedings of the juvenile courts and the adoption process.

They further argued that she served two years in prison away from her child for violating a law that was determined unconstitutional by the Supreme Court shortly after she was incarcerated.

At the time of the Supreme Court arguments, the situation drew criticism from Guatemalan Ambassador to the United States Francisco Villagran de Leon, who said children of undocumented immigrants should not be given up for adoption just because they are here illegally.

Although justices on the Supreme Court unanimously agreed that Romero’s legal rights as a parent were unfairly terminated when the Jasper County court failed to take proper legal steps, the court split 4-3 on how to resolve who should get custody of the boy and when. The majority ordered the case back to the lower courts.

One justice cast the case in biblical terms, referencing the story of Solomon who was called upon to resolve a child custody dispute.

“At least Solomon had the option to decree that the child be cut in half, ” Justice Michael Wolff wrote in a separate opinion. “All we lesser judges have is the law, and it is our duty to make sure that the law is obeyed.”

I used to think Japan had fucked up ideals about immigration, but this is just sick. I mean, deportation, fine, but taking away someone’s kid just cause they’re immigrants? Are you fucking kidding me? Oh well, I suppose you can only go so far with this kind of thing. Sooner or later people are gonna start fighting back and then all hell will break loose. Can’t go anywhere else in this world anymore without shit like this happening. Next up, let’s talk about Florida’s morons.

 

Planet UCF 1.01 is introduced to the world of astronomy

 

University of Central Florida scientists have discovered a new planet outside our solar system that is the closest Earth-size planet ever discovered. And they have named it after UCF.

Planet UCF 1.01, an “exoplanet” orbiting a red dwarf star called GJ 436, is about two-thirds the size of Earth and only 33 light years distant. “Cosmically speaking, that’s right around the corner,” said discoverer Kevin Stevenson, though that works out to 194 trillion miles.

Exoplanets circle stars beyond our Sun, but only a handful smaller than Earth have been discovered, according to NASA. UCF 1.01 is about 5,200 miles in diameter, slightly larger than Mars, smaller than Venus.

It’s so close to its star – GJ 436 is about half the size of our Sun – that it revolves around it once every 1.4 days (about 33 1/2 hours.) It’s so hot, at least 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, that it has no atmosphere and may have a molten surface.

The discovery will be detailed in an article to be published online todayby The Astrophysical Journal.

The news is expected to create international buzz among astronomers and physicists, both because of the way Stevenson and his colleagues found it, and because of where they were looking when they did, said Michael Werner, project scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif..

He and other scientists at UCF’s Planetary Sciences Group were using the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope, an infrared space telescope launched into orbit around the sun from Cape Canaveral in August 2003. That telescope was designed and is used mainly to study planets and other space objects that already have been discovered, or to look into deep, deep space.

UCF 1.01 is the first planet actually discovered by Spitzer. Most have been discovered by the NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope, which is designed for that sort of research.

And not many scientists have been looking for planets around red dwarfs, which are smaller and much dimmer than yellow stars such as the Sun. That should change now that UCF 1.01 demonstrates red dwarfs can have solar systems, including Earth-size planets, Werner said.

“It was a serendipitous discovery,” Stevenson said.

UCF 1.01 is in the constellation Leo, though even its star GJ 436 is too faint to be seen with the naked eye. The planet itself can’t even be seen with Spitzer, or any other telescope.

Scientists generally can’t see planets outside our solar system, so they look for them by looking at the light emitted by stars. When the infrared light streaming from the star dips by a small amount, it could mean a planet is passing by the star, casting a tiny shadow. When that starlight dips regularly, and predictably, that’s probably caused by a planet.

Stevenson, who was a physics doctoral student until he was awarded his doctorate in May; UCF planetary sciences professor Joseph Harrington, the project’s principal investigator; and UCF graduate student Nate Lust were looking at GJ 436 two years ago to gather data on a much-larger planet, about the size of Neptune, that already had been detected in orbit around it.

While watching the red dwarf, Stevenson and the others witnessed an unexplained dip in the starlight.

“That’s kind of the ‘Aha!’ moment,” Stevenson said.

They asked NASA to aim Spitzer at the star again for another look. They studied hundreds of archived hours of observation data from that star gathered previously by Spitzer and other telescopes.

“Several weeks later it came to the epiphany: well, maybe it’s another planet,” said Stevenson said, who is now at the University of Chicago.

Hello, UCF 1.01.

Stevenson cautioned that at this point UCF 1.01 only qualifies as a candidate planet. Scientists don’t award full planetary status until they have enough data to determine the planet’s mass, and Spitzer and the other telescopes can’t do that yet with something as small as UCF 1.01.

There’s something else in the data though. There’s another unexplained dip. It has shown up only a couple of times, but it’s promising, Stevenson said.

They’ve already named it: UCF 1.02.

 

Really now? I wasn’t aware, that people like that could do something as absurd as this. My god…

 

And finally our last story for this evening, enjoy this…lovely article.

 

What a pilchard! Dopey lorry driver spills 24 tons of SARDINES onto road after forgetting to close the back door

 

A dopey truck driver caused caused a enormous traffic jam after he spilled 24 tons of sardines onto the road because he forget to close the back door.

Motorists along the highway near Kolobrzeg, Poland, were held up for hours while workers cleared up the huge trail of fish which had been scattered for several hundred metres along both sides of the road.

‘At first we thought it was some sort of divine judgement – like a plague of locusts or frogs,’ said one motorist Wladyslaw Nowak, 62.

Police say the fish came from a transporter driven by trucker Jakub Carowski, 26, who had failed to shut the back doors properly.

As well as a £50  fine, the driver has to fork out a further £5,000 to pay for clearing up the road.

‘You could say it’s the scales of justice,’ said one officer.

Enjoy the gallery folks. Good night, everyone. Grass signing out.

University of Central Florida scientists have discovered a new planet outside our solar system that is the closest Earth-size planet ever discovered. And they have named it after UCF.

Planet UCF 1.01, an “exoplanet” orbiting a red dwarf star called GJ 436, is about two-thirds the size of Earth and only 33 light years distant. “Cosmically speaking, that’s right around the corner,” said discoverer Kevin Stevenson, though that works out to 194 trillion miles.

Exoplanets circle stars beyond our Sun, but only a handful smaller than Earth have been discovered, according to NASA. UCF 1.01 is about 5,200 miles in diameter, slightly larger than Mars, smaller than Venus.

It’s so close to its star – GJ 436 is about half the size of our Sun – that it revolves around it once every 1.4 days (about 33 1/2 hours.) It’s so hot, at least 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, that it has no atmosphere and may have a molten surface.

The discovery will be detailed in an article to be published online todayby The Astrophysical Journal.

The news is expected to create international buzz among astronomers and physicists, both because of the way Stevenson and his colleagues found it, and because of where they were looking when they did, said Michael Werner, project scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif..

He and other scientists at UCF’s Planetary Sciences Group were using the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope, an infrared space telescope launched into orbit around the sun from Cape Canaveral in August 2003. That telescope was designed and is used mainly to study planets and other space objects that already have been discovered, or to look into deep, deep space.

UCF 1.01 is the first planet actually discovered by Spitzer. Most have been discovered by the NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope, which is designed for that sort of research.

And not many scientists have been looking for planets around red dwarfs, which are smaller and much dimmer than yellow stars such as the Sun. That should change now that UCF 1.01 demonstrates red dwarfs can have solar systems, including Earth-size planets, Werner said.

“It was a serendipitous discovery,” Stevenson said.

UCF 1.01 is in the constellation Leo, though even its star GJ 436 is too faint to be seen with the naked eye. The planet itself can’t even be seen with Spitzer, or any other telescope.

Scientists generally can’t see planets outside our solar system, so they look for them by looking at the light emitted by stars. When the infrared light streaming from the star dips by a small amount, it could mean a planet is passing by the star, casting a tiny shadow. When that starlight dips regularly, and predictably, that’s probably caused by a planet.

Stevenson, who was a physics doctoral student until he was awarded his doctorate in May; UCF planetary sciences professor Joseph Harrington, the project’s principal investigator; and UCF graduate student Nate Lust were looking at GJ 436 two years ago to gather data on a much-larger planet, about the size of Neptune, that already had been detected in orbit around it.

While watching the red dwarf, Stevenson and the others witnessed an unexplained dip in the starlight.

“That’s kind of the ‘Aha!’ moment,” Stevenson said.

They asked NASA to aim Spitzer at the star again for another look. They studied hundreds of archived hours of observation data from that star gathered previously by Spitzer and other telescopes.

“Several weeks later it came to the epiphany: well, maybe it’s another planet,” said Stevenson said, who is now at the University of Chicago.

Hello, UCF 1.01.

Stevenson cautioned that at this point UCF 1.01 only qualifies as a candidate planet. Scientists don’t award full planetary status until they have enough data to determine the planet’s mass, and Spitzer and the other telescopes can’t do that yet with something as small as UCF 1.01.

There’s something else in the data though. There’s another unexplained dip. It has shown up only a couple of times, but it’s promising, Stevenson said.

They’ve already named it: UCF 1.02.