I saw a picture of this article on Facebook and figured I’d Google it. So here you go, a fight between a mailbox and a teen on drugs.

 

By Jeremy Deutsch, Coquitlam Now July 20, 2012

In the battle of man versus mailbox, score this one a draw.

Port Moody police had their hands full over the weekend dealing with a teenager who decided to pick a fight with a mailbox, apparently while high on LSD.

The incident started around 5 a.m. Sunday at the corner of Moray Street and Portview Place.

Police were called to the area after a passerby saw someone dancing, talking then fighting a mailbox.

“Our members attended and saw this 15-year-old kid literally talking to this mailbox and full-out fighting it,” said Port Moody police spokesman Const. Luke van Winkel.

He said the officers tried to calm him down, but it was clear the teen, described as being six feet tall, was under the influence of some type of substance.

The incident turned serious when police tried to take him into custody.

The teen turned his rage toward the officers.

It ultimately took three officers to subdue the youth.

He was taken to hospital where he was treated for cuts and bruises and released with no charges.

“It’s just a kid who made some bad choices. Criminal charges aren’t in the best interest for that kid, ” Van Winkel said, adding police don’t believe the teen made a conscious decision to fight with the officers.

A pair of tweets was sent out by the police department that morning regarding the incident: “A call of a male fighting with a mailbox. Mailbox fighter arrested after violently fighting with police.”

The department said such incidents highlight the difficulties officers face when dealing with people on illegal substances.

“When people are on drugs – on these types of stimulants – it’s amazing what they can do, these are three big police officers,” Van Winkel said. “That’s part of the drug use.”

He also noted it’s quite rare nowadays for teens to be using LSD, which is a hallucinogenic, because it can lead to a bad trip.

He added designer drugs like ecstasy are more common.

Every summer the reminder goes out, and every summer someone ignores the warning not to leave their child or pet in a warm car.

A recent incident has Port Moody police once again reminding motorists about the dangers posed by the hot weather.

Earlier this month, the department sent out a tweet regarding the incident.

“Two children, 1+3, locked in a sealed van parked in the sun. In 25 deg heat, car temp can be 100 in mins. There is no ‘gone just a minute.'”

Port Moody police spokesman Const. Luke van Winkel explained that the parent was running into the store and decided to leave the kids inside the van.

An officer was in the area and happened to come across the vehicle.

In this case, the parent came back to the car before any action was taken, noting they had only run into the store for a minute.

But police are quick to point out the risks are too great, even if it is just for a minute.

“From a policing perspective, if you’ve left your kids inside the car, you probably won’t have a window when you come back, because we’re going to be getting them out of there,” Van Winkel said.

In this case, he said the parent was given a warning, adding police find education works better than punishment.

Moving onward, since I plan on making use of my quickies to have more than a single story, you guys can enjoy this article as well.

A female elementary school teacher has been caught operating a hidden camera at a pool changing room, saying she “had an interest in the breasts of pretty girls,” although either because she is a woman or a teacher police and her school seem to have decided to let her get off with impunity.

The 24-year-old woman, a teacher at an elementary school in Tokyo’s Kunitachi city, had availed herself of the pool facilities at the Toshimaen amusement park in Nerima city in order to secretly install a camera in the female changing rooms there.

She was soon rumbled by a security guard who noted something suspicious and alerted police, who began an investigation.

They soon caught her, although for some mysterious reason reports omit to mention her being arrested.

She even admitted her crimes to police and school, pleading simple lust:

“I was interested in the breasts of pretty women, so I recorded them so I could watch them when I felt like it. It was inexcusable.”

Her school has apologised for employing a criminal pervert, but seems to omitted any mention of whether it will punish her:

“We think it is inexcusable that one of our staff has betrayed the trust of children and parents in this way.”

It has not escaped the attention of teacher-watchers that no mention made of her being arrested or charged, her name was not released, and the school did not specify what, if any, disciplinary action it took against her – a stark contrast to the arrest, public humiliation and sacking which would likely follow from a male or non-teacher undertaking the same course of action.

 

I’m sure this will all blow down eventually. And our last 2 articles..

 

Genius: Japan Reduces Radiation with Lead Lined Detectors

Author: Artefact

Disgust with the morally degenerate and extraordinarily dangerous antics of Japan’s nuclear power industry has reached an even greater pitch with the revelations that their novel approach to reducing the radiation exposure of clean-up workers was to line their radiation detectors with lead.

According to taped conversations provided by whistleblowers, one of the subcontractors Tokyo’s reviled nuclear power monopoly Tepco hired to clean up the fallout from its exploding reactors reduced the radiation exposure of its clean-up workers by making them wear lead-lined dosimeters.

The directive apparently came straight from their board, and was considered essential as otherwise the workers would have reached the legal limits for radiation exposure too quickly.

One director ordered a team of 10 workers to commence work with the lead shielded dosimeters, but 3 objected. The director later called a “meeting” with the holdouts, which one of them cunningly taped and much later provided to the press.

The director denies giving the orders, but several other employees affirm it was given.

Tepco’s approach to managing the disaster was apparently to subcontract out all the dirty work to a web of smaller companies, many of whom seem to have got round radiation exposure limits by simply hiring people off the street and dumping them as soon as their limit was reached, if they were lucky.

The government has said it will investigate reports of the radiation shielded radiation detectors, although somehow it seems online calls for the company’s executives to be charged with murder will not be heeded.

And finally…

Chinese have been outraged by the case of a man who was left to drown by the family he saved, with the rescued boy’s mother saying his fate was nothing to do with them.

According to local media reports, a 27-year-old man out walking his dogs in China’s Hunan province came upon a family swimming in a local river who were in some difficulty as their 5-year-old son had been swept away.

Unable to rescue him themselves, they called for help, and the man responded by bravely leaping into the fast flowing river to rescue the boy and his family, aided by two other bystanders.

However, after rescuing the boy he himself was swept away and drowned to death.

A sense of tragedy soon turned to incensed outrage after it was reported that the boy’s family promptly left the scene as soon as their child was safe, leaving their rescuer to drown, and when questioned by locals they merely replied it was “none of their business.”

Chinese online, perhaps reminded of certain other recent events, wasted no time in venting their rage and condemning the “heartless” family.

Supposedly the family did suffer a change of heart and weepingly made a rather belated display of sorrow and gratitude at his funeral.

 

And for the record, this isn’t journalism. It’s just a really bad news blog that I throw up each week, and only America can have the guts to call this kind of shoddy act, journalism. Good night, everybody.