As you people have undoubtedly guessed by now, The Pony Show Weekend Edition post was trashed. First of all, this isn’t a porn blog, I don’t post porn on here, so don’t come here hoping to see it. This blog has been for a long time a news blog of sorts with a few pieces of anime mixed in. I don’t need a ton of hits on one post just reach post markers of over 100 a day. I think that’s ludicrous to rely on a single post for higher popularity. One quick plug for you guys, then we’ll head to news. For all of you that enjoy R34, here’s something.

 

Anyway, let’s get to the news.

 

 

Shiga Suicide Bullies “Will Be Arrested”

Author: Artefact

Police have finally announced plans to arrest the bullies who tormented their classmate into killing himself, whilst it has emerged that the ringleader’s mother was head of the school’s PTA and along with the teachers apparently did everything she could to pin the blame on the victim’s family.

3 of his schoolmates are expected to be charged with 6 charges of assault and extortion, although as they will be charged as juveniles they will not face any time in prison.

As the scandal unfolded it was widely rumoured that the parents of the boys responsible were well connected, and this was one of the reasons the school refused to accept any connection with the victim’s suicide and the bullying it did nothing about.

It appears this was correct – the father of “boy A” was the director of a company in Kyoto, and his mother chaired the school’s PTA.

Rather than investigating the circumstances of the bullying, she was busily spreading word that “the boy who killed himself had family issues, and our boy was only listening to his problems” and that “they were just sparring to let off steam.”

She had her son transferred to another school after the boy’s suicide, fearing a scandal might disrupt his education, and he is said to have proved popular at his new school (although other reports say he has been “ignored”).

Whilst police still have still yet to arrest the boys accused of bullying their classmate to death, they have been busy making other arrests – including a 69-year-old man who sent a letter to the prefectural governor in which he threatened to kill one of the bullies, and a 16-year-old high schooler who managed to get the school closed with a fake bomb threat.

Whilst public and political pressure is now such that it is hard to imagine police not arresting the boy’s tormentors, there is much doubt as to whether they will face any meaningful sanction or any action will be taken against the school authorities who ignored his plight and then attempted to cover up the scandal.

So as we can see, bullying isn’t the right way to go, so ya don’t bully your peers. Who knows, you may end up working for them one day, then you’ll get your comeuppance. So it’s been a while since I posted a figurine so have at thee.

 

 

Touko Kurosawa Bondage Ero-Figure

Author: Leon

Daiki Kougyo’s latest ero-figure features original character Touko Kurosawa in some mild bondage action, whose clothes (or what remains of them) can be removed in order to prevent her overheating – though the manacles stay on come what may.

The figure will be available in December 2012.

 

So let’s talk about free ATM cash, a guy spread the word on it on Facebook…well we can tell what happened then.

 

 

CBA customers used Facebook to spread work about ‘free’ ATM cash

WA POLICE have charged 19 Commonwealth Bank customers over a series of ATM bank frauds after a technical glitch allowed them to withdraw large sums of money, overdrawing on their accounts. Major Fraud Squad detectives have laid 197 charges over the string of frauds, which happened across WA between December 2010 and March 2011.Police said the CBA customers withdrew money they were not entitled to during routine software maintenance.

The police investigation, code-named Operation Elvaston, honed in on social networking sites which the offenders used to brag to about the scheme.

Police said it appeared that the offenders had initially stumbled upon the glitch by fluke, but then spread the word through Twitter and Facebook.

More than $200,000 was stolen and another $7 million attempted to be accessed throught the ATMs as part of the scam. In one case, a customer was able to steal $30,000 in multiple ATM transactions.
Det-Const Jennie Ayre said CBA had identified a weakness in its software maintenance systems and the glitch was uncovered during checks of their record keeping. The case was referred to the Major Fraud Squad in May 2011.

“The Major Fraud Squad commenced an investigation and identified Commonwealth customers that had been withdrawing funds in excess of what was in their account,” Det-Const Ayre said.

Customers were identified through social networking sites and on CCTV at ATM locations.

Det-Const Ayre said said police were seeking numerous other people who had capitalised on the glitch and advised them to contact the bank to arrange a payment plan to repay the money.

“I think it was just a fluke. Someone has found out and it’s just spread,” she said.

“If you don’t have the money in the account, it’s not yours to take. You are not entitled to the money and it’s a criminal offence of stealing.”

The glitch has been fixed.

The charges carry a maximum penalty of seven years’ in jail.

And Abrakadabra San Bernadino County files for bankruptcy.

SAN BERNARDINO – An attorney’s move to collect $1.4million the city had agreed to pay to the families of three men killed by police prompted an early bankruptcy filing to avoid paying the settlements, officials said Thursday.“He was moving to execute, and had the judge taken action the city wouldn’t have been able to make its next payroll,” said City Attorney James F. Penman. “Bankruptcy protection prevents him from seizing our assets.”

In addition to three cases alleging excessive force, which Penman declined to elaborate on, he said another creditor had begun trying to seize machinery from the city last week.

Woodland Hills-based attorney Dale Galipo said he tried to get the judge to force payment or prioritize settlement payments in the three police cases – which the city, plaintiffs and judge had agreed to at various points over the past year – because he wanted to make sure his clients were paid.

“In our judicial system, we operate in good faith,” Galipo said. “I’m very disappointed, and I’m very concerned for my clients, and I’m trying to do everything to make sure they get what was agreed to.”

Galipo said the city agreed to pay the families of Cedric May, Jerriel Da’Shawn Allen and Terry Wayne Nash $525,000, $530,000 and $686,000 respectively.

The city already paid $325,000 in the May case, he said.

A closer look at the three cases follows:

Police shot May in 2009, and reported at the time that May grabbed an officer’s genitals and Taser while fighting with police.

The shooting happened the night May’s family had a barbecue to celebrate his release from jail the previous day. Family members said at the time that contrary to police statements, he was shot after being handcuffed.

Allen was 19 when he was shot by officers after a chase in which a vehicle crashed through three backyard fences.

He was a passenger in a Chevrolet Tahoe that reportedly ran a stop sign, then kicked up dust, making it difficult for officers to see.

Authorities said at the trial they had heard someone yell “shoot ’em, shoot ’em,” and had seen Allen look at officers with his hands hidden.

Allen was later determined to be unarmed and reaching for his marijuana.

Nash, also known as Terry Jackson, died in police custody in 2011 after a Taser was repeatedly used on him.

Officers said Nash, a 250-pound 22-year-old who reportedly had paranoid schizophrenia and was under the influence of methamphetamine and marijuana, continued struggling even while they were waiting for an ambulance.

A federal jury in Los Angeles determined police were unnecessarily rough and improperly denied medical aid on the scene.

The city’s delay of payments may backfire, Galipo said.

“This bankruptcy may not last forever, and two or three years from now, I may be asking a jury for 3 or 4 million dollars,” he said. “(City officials) may say they should have been more reasonable now.”

Emergency filing

But the decision to file an emergency bankruptcy petition may help City Hall if any creditors challenge San Bernardino’s eligibility for bankruptcy protection, said attorney Michael Sweet of the San Francisco offices of Fox Rothschild.

Sweet, who advised officials in the Bay Area city of Richmond on a plan to avert a bankruptcy filing, said bankruptcy law makes it easier for debtors to file a case without going through a mediation process with their creditors if the debtor could lose money in a court judgement.

San Bernardino’s situation is particularly interesting, Sweet said, because he views the case as combining aspects of the Orange County and Vallejo bankruptcies.

Orange County went bankrupt in 1994 after the failure of the county’s investment policies. Its treasurer at the time, Robert Citron, ended up pleading guilty to multiple criminal charges.

Vallejo, the first California city to declare and emerge from bankruptcy, took the action because its revenues fell far short of its financial commitments, Sweet said.

Allegations that San Bernardino’s financial records have been falsified for 13 of the past 16 years complicate things, Sweet said.

“Here you’ve got both things, which make for an extraordinary mess,” Sweet said.

Penman said he did not expect any difficulties as a result of the early bankruptcy filing, although it would have been more efficient to file all paperwork at once.

“I don’t think there’s any substantive difference,” he said, “other than we were hoping to use the next two weeks to gather more information and file more documentation with the initial filing pages.”

Those documents should still be filed by the middle of the month, Penman said.

The city’s employees are among the creditors who may choose to challenge City Hall in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Any decisions to contest the city’s claims, however, will not be made until San Bernardino officials show more information on the city’s financial condition. The initial filing contained only minimal information, such as the city having more than $1billion worth of assets and liabilities.

“There are some questions about what their actual numbers are, and we need to see the numbers that are filed under penalty of perjury,” said Corey Glave, the attorney who represents San Bernardino Professional Firefighters.

The San Bernardino Police Officers Association’s attorney, Dieter Dammeier, does not anticipate any challenges to the bankruptcy itself but will be keeping guard to make sure the city doesn’t impose any changes to officers’ labor contract without a judicial order.

“If the city deviates from the status quo, we probably would challenge that,” he said.

Other city employees haven’t seen any changes to their working conditions now that the filing is official, but labor representative George Swift said he’s contemplating a meeting with the city manager and finance director to see San Bernardino’s books.

That’s our show for tonight folks, see you all next week, same bullshit time same bullshit face. Goodnight everyone.

SAN BERNARDINO – An attorney’s move to collect $1.4million the city had agreed to pay to the families of three men killed by police prompted an early bankruptcy filing to avoid paying the settlements, officials said Thursday.

“He was moving to execute, and had the judge taken action the city wouldn’t have been able to make its next payroll,” said City Attorney James F. Penman. “Bankruptcy protection prevents him from seizing our assets.”

In addition to three cases alleging excessive force, which Penman declined to elaborate on, he said another creditor had begun trying to seize machinery from the city last week.

Woodland Hills-based attorney Dale Galipo said he tried to get the judge to force payment or prioritize settlement payments in the three police cases – which the city, plaintiffs and judge had agreed to at various points over the past year – because he wanted to make sure his clients were paid.

“In our judicial system, we operate in good faith,” Galipo said. “I’m very disappointed, and I’m very concerned for my clients, and I’m trying to do everything to make sure they get what was agreed to.”